Driving abroad? Learn some crucial rules before you travel

If you’re one of the two million British motorists driving in EU countries this year, make sure you are fully prepared before you travel.

It is estimated that 80% of Brits are nervous about unclear road signage, speed limits, toll roads and a whole array of unfamiliar driving rules.

Most concerning is the lack of basic knowledge of your insurance cover when driving abroad.

In the good old days you would ring your insurers and obtain a Green Card which effectively satisfied any concern you would have relating to your cover, however, since dispensing with Green Cards, insurers now adopt a two-tier approach to the cover actually provided for you.

Your basic UK insurance policy merely provides the minimum cover required by law when driving in every EU country, however, it does not provide a number of covers ranging from actual damage  to your vehicle, personal injury, theft of/from the vehicle, etc. At www.fleetcover.co.uk we can provide you with the necessary advice before you travel and provide you with peace of mind.

In addition to your insurance requirements, are you aware of the documentation you need to carry with you at all times when travelling in the EU?

Be sure to pack both your paper and photo ID licence before you travel along with the original registration document (V5C) as proof of vehicle ownership, or, if driving a company owned vehicle, ask your employer to provide a letter confirming that you have authority to drive their vehicle.

Most EU member countries now make it compulsory to carry a number of items that are not required in the UK, for example: GB sticker; Warning triangle(s); Reflective jacket; Fire extinguisher; First aid kit; Headlamp adjustment; No radar/safety detectors; Daytime running lights.

Remember, if you have an accident or problem in Europe – 112 is the common emergency telephone number that can be dialled free of charge from any fixed or mobile telephone in order to reach emergency services (ambulance, fire and rescue, police) in all member states of the European Union, as well as several other countries around the world.

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